seems like using an android device might be the easiest way to get a wireless video system
for wearable computer vision.

http://www.google.com/search?aq=f&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=python+process+video
python process video - Google Search
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1480431/most-used-python-module-for-video-processing
Most used Python module for video processing? - Stack Overflow
http://www.google.com/search?aq=f&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=opencv#sclient=psy&hl=en&source=hp&q=opencv+android+tutorial&pbx=1&oq=opencv+android&aq=1&aqi=g5&aql=1&gs_sm=c&gs_upl=0l0l1l161l0l0l0l0l0l0l0l0ll0l0&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&fp=d5c279fcc719c6fe&biw=1024&bih=514
opencv android tutorial - Google Search
http://opencv.willowgarage.com/wiki/Android
Android - OpenCV Wiki
http://opencv.itseez.com/trunk/doc/tutorials/introduction/android_binary_package/android_binary_package.html
Using Android binary package with Eclipse — OpenCV v2.3 documentation
http://opencv.itseez.com/trunk/doc/tutorials/introduction/android_binary_package/android_binary_package_using_with_NDK.html#android-binary-package-with-ndk
Using C++ OpenCV code with Android binary package — OpenCV v2.3 documentation
http://opencv.willowgarage.com/wiki/Welcome
Welcome - OpenCV Wiki
http://opencv.willowgarage.com/wiki/FullOpenCVWiki
FullOpenCVWiki - OpenCV Wiki
http://opencv.willowgarage.com/wiki/VideoCodecs
VideoCodecs - OpenCV Wiki
http://opencv.willowgarage.com/wiki/VideoSurveillance
VideoSurveillance - OpenCV Wiki
http://www.google.com/search?aq=f&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=wireless+video+glasses#pq=wireless%20video%20transmitter&hl=en&sugexp=gsih&cp=35&gs_id=19&xhr=t&q=wireless+video+transmitter+wearable&qe=d2lyZWxlc3MgdmlkZW8gdHJhbnNtaXR0ZXIgd2VhcmFibGU&qesig=tDjdtgLlh1vVy2jiJGwwYQ&pkc=AFgZ2tlwfjObZX5D91Fin1bIJXYZATDcTN77eQ36LZ4UqUYpyxVzwS_i685kpMLpbp6L45jncnKwsR79XVtsRwwaHSqwiF8Lxw&pf=p&sclient=psy&source=hp&pbx=1&oq=wireless+video+transmitter+wearable&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&gs_sm=&gs_upl=&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&fp=d5c279fcc719c6fe&biw=1024&bih=514
wireless video transmitter wearable - Google Search
http://fullblasttech.com/COFDM-wireless-video-transmitters.html
COFDM Wireless Video Transmitters | Covert | Portable | Surveillance
http://www.google.com/search?aq=f&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=android+devices
android devices - Google Search
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_Android_devices
Comparison of Android devices - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


many xml parsers are built into Python. Documentation is available:
http://docs.python.org/library/markup.html

I usually prefer ElementTree:
http://docs.python.org/library/xml.etree.elementtree.html

here is a simple example, adapted from the web:

from xml.etree.ElementTree import ElementTree
tree = ElementTree()
#this reads in the xml data from a file:
tree.parse("index.xhtml")
#

p = tree.find("body/p") # Finds first occurrence of tag p in body
p
#
links = list(p.iter("a")) # Returns list of all links
links
#[, ]
for i in links: # Iterates through all found links
i.attrib["target"] = "blank"
tree.write("output.xhtml")


this approach seems to work better:
from xml.etree import ElementTree

f = open("evernote_export-20110809.enex")
root = ElementTree.fromstring(f.read())
print root
root.items()
root.findall('note')

---------------
Once you have a fresh instance of Ubuntu running, it is time to install a few critical applications. The goal is to get to the point of logging moments offline, minimally.

It is best to perform the following steps on a *live* instance, just incase you install something you didn't mean to.

There are some general system settings that are good to take care of first:

Configure gedit to insert a date, timestamp in the correct format (from moments/editors/gedit.txt)

Gedit ships with a plug-in that is enabled by default for inserting the date and time.
This functionality can be found under:
Edit->Insert Date and Time...

Edit->Preferences->Plugins->Insert Date/Time->Configure Plugin
To conform to the moments date/timestamp, use a custom format as follows:


------------------------------
Once you have a fresh instance of Ubuntu running, it is time to install a few critical applications. The goal is to get to the point of logging moments offline, minimally.

It is best to perform the following steps on a *live* instance, just incase you install something you didn't mean to.

There are some general system settings that are good to take care of first:

Configure gedit to insert a date, timestamp in the correct format (from moments/editors/gedit.txt)

Gedit ships with a plug-in that is enabled by default for inserting the date and time.
This functionality can be found under:
Edit->Insert Date and Time...

Edit->Preferences->Plugins->Insert Date/Time->Configure Plugin
To conform to the moments date/timestamp, use a custom format as follows: